11 Reasons Why To Join The Navy

Consider all your options and learn the ways the Navy could benefit you.

So you have always had this curiosity of why people serve for our country. I mean the benefits must be pretty good to have join something like that, right? Well I too have grown up admiring those who served, being somehow curious about their online payday GA lives, and often asked the most ridiculous questions like, « how often do you have to go on patrols? » For some of you that are truly intrigued, you have probably been on all of the armed forces websites and looked things over. For me, ruling out the Air Force and Marines was simple. I have never been on a plane and I don’t care to ever get caught dead in a dessert. Literally. My next decision was choosing from the Navy, the Army, and the all too forgotten Coast Guard. Below is 11 reasons why I am choosing to pursue to enlist in the Navy Reserves, it may sum up all those factors on those sites, and it may help give you a different idea of what your expectations are for which ever branch you want. Take from it as you will.

1. Travel

The biggest thing that attracted me to the Navy was not only the opportunity to travel but the way you get to travel. I personally love water and would enjoy to get to see all kinds of new cultures by soaring through the ocean on the world’s most powerful aircraft carriers. What a way to feel bonded with the Earth by actually spending time with it, rather than the typical fly here and get there as quickly as possible, and stay on land at base. Sometimes the unknown is the most exhilarating.

2. GI Bill

For a lot of people who have served, this has been a major benefit and it applies to all armed forces. The GI Bill gives you educational assistance for being in the military. There are many forms of the GI Bill, the Post 9/11 being the most common, but each form has its own requirements. According to the VA or Veterans Affairs, the Post 9/11 GI Bill will assist you or your dependents on tuition and fees, provide you with a monthly housing allowance if you are attending school more than half time, and provide you with a books and supplies stipend. After my first time talking to a recruiter, I now also know a lot more about the GI bill than I had before. You get access to these benefits after serving at least 90 days in active duty service, however, you will not get 100% of the benefits until you have served 36 months in active duty total. You can also find that information through the VA. For those going in the Reserve, your drill days are counted as four active duty days instead of two. All sailors basic training and A school is also counted as active duty service, the two combined is about five and a half months of service depending on your choice of school. Yes you have to work for the GI Bill, but for those who may not be eligible for financial aid, or would be granted very little, or for those who don’t want to take out a loan for school, or are like me and are too lazy to write 756392 essays for 500 dollar scholarships to pay for my thousand of dollars in tuition, maybe a weekend a month is not such a bad sacrifice for these benefits.